Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Research Results

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Our survey was posted online for a period of one week. Following this period, data was pulled down from SurveyMonkey in the form of a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. Survey results were converted from text to numeric answers. All statistical analysis was conducted in IBM SPSS v23 for Linux on the OpenSUSE Leap 42.1 operating system.


The first two of the following tables are histograms showing the range of Emotional Intelligence and Computer Anxiety scores for our respondents. For Computer Anxiety, we see a strong skew towards lower overall scores, demonstrating a bias in our respondents. For Emotional Intelligence, the scores cluster around the median with a slight skew towards higher values.


Next, we show histograms for both the raw ages of our respondents and for the recoded ages into the accepted age range categories defined by the Pew Research Center (2015). The ages cluster strongly towards the middle with few responses from people in the Generation Z and Silent Generation age groups, again showing a bias in our results.



In all of our analysis, we used the Pearson Correlation to examine the correlation between our independent and dependent variables. In order to control for age, we used the Select Cases function in SPSS to look at the correlation between our independent and dependent variables against the three age ranges that we had a significant number of respondents for. This was done using the SPSS Recode into Different Variables function. The following scatter plot maps the responses of our two variables.



For the first test, we looked at the two alone. We found that there was a -.109 for correlation. Next, we started adjusting for age. Because we only had one response from a person in the Generation Z age group and only three responses for people in the Silent Generation age group, we did not analyze the relationship for that age group. The first table shows the summary of the Pearson Correlation results for each of the age ranges that we had a significant number of responses for. Next are the tables for the results of each analysis. Correlations ranged from -.189 to -.275 for the different age ranges. Again, the age ranges defined by the Pew Research Center (2015) are listed in Appendix B.

Correlation Summary
Full Sample -.109
Millennial -.275
Generation X -.192
Baby Boomer -.189


Correlations Full Sample


Computer_Anxiety Emotional_Intellegence
Computer_Anxiety Pearson Correlation 1 -.109
Sig. (2-tailed)

.213
N 133 133
Emotional_Intellegence Pearson Correlation -.109 1
Sig. (2-tailed) .213

N 133 133



Correlations Age = 2


Computer_Anxiety Emotional_Intellegence
Computer_Anxiety Pearson Correlation 1 -.275
Sig. (2-tailed)

.055
N 49 49
Emotional_Intellegence Pearson Correlation -.275 1
Sig. (2-tailed) .055

N 49 49


Correlations Age = 3


Computer_Anxiety Emotional_Intellegence
Computer_Anxiety Pearson Correlation 1 -.192
Sig. (2-tailed)

.254
N 37 37
Emotional_Intellegence Pearson Correlation -.192 1
Sig. (2-tailed) .254

N 37 37


Correlations Age = 4


Computer_Anxiety Emotional_Intellegence
Computer_Anxiety Pearson Correlation 1 .189
Sig. (2-tailed)

.225
N 43 43
Emotional_Intellegence Pearson Correlation .189 1
Sig. (2-tailed) .225

N 43 43

In the end, we found that there is a weak correlation between Computer Anxiety and Emotional Intelligence. This weak correlation extended across all age ranges, peaking at -.275 for the Millennial age group. We did find evidence supporting our three hypotheses, which supports the findings of Zare and Nouri (2013). However, since none of the correlation calculations were strong or showed a statistical significance, we are forced to reject the three hypotheses.


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